Simplicity Story: A Tale of Two Kitchens

originally posted in November 2014

Three months ago, this was my kitchen:

The kitchen has a window into the living room.

 

DSC_0038

 

Notice the double sink with hot water, the dishwasher, the oven, and all the floor and cupboard space?  While the apartment kitchen was certainly small, it was an adjustment to move from that to this:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

You can imagine what an adjustment this was!

And around the same time that I moved, Lois from The Eco-Grandma moved from a 300 square foot apartment into a house.  This, too, was an adjustment.

As we settled into our new homes, I began to notice the changes that I was making in my kitchen, and I began to wonder what changes Lois was making.  What lessons had she learned from simplicity?  What luxuries was she choosing to indulge in, now that she can?

As a result of the changes we have made, Lois and I decided to co-ordinate our posts and invite you into our kitchens today.  I will show you how things work in my kitchen, and then you can head over to The Eco-Grandma to visit Lois’s kitchen.  (And we will both be sharing a recipe with you!)

Living in less than 200 square feet has been interesting, and our biggest adjustment has been the galley.  First off, the companionway, aka our DOOR, is right above the counter.  In fact, the countertop is a step that must be used in order to enter the cabin without falling down.  Below the counter is a small ladder, which we refer to as “the steps.”  Both Beanie and the cat like to perch on the steps, especially when I am cooking.

So where do I stand when I cook?  In a teeny, tiny corner, next to the steps!  Our kitchen is equipped with a single-basin RV sink.  While we have a knob for both hot and cold water, only the cold water knob will turn on the faucet.  The water temperature is quite cold in the winter, but hot in the summer.  This is due to the fact that we use shore water, which sits in an RV hose for great periods of time.

Our range is a luxury for a sailboat–it’s dual-powered.  We run it on electricity in our slip, but we can run it on alcohol when we’re anchored out.  We have a bottle Everclear for this purpose!  The range has a stainless cover that turns it into additional counter space when we’re not using it.

We also have a gas grill mounted on the stern rail–it doubles as our oven.  When we feel like picnicking, we have access to communal gas and charcoal grills.  We have a medium-sized dorm fridge and a small amount of cupboard space.

Having such a small kitchen has led me to learn to do without some amenities.  This hasn’t been a huge adjustment, since we were already living rather minimalistically.  We already had service for 3, 3 pans, no toaster, and limited appliances.  But what have we gotten rid of since we moved here?

  • Our blender.  Yes, I used to love making smoothies.  But it isn’t worth the effort to unstow the blender, and then to clean up afterwards.
  • Our plates.  This isn’t permanent, but they broke in the move.  After a month of using bowls, we missed them and bought some Thanksgiving-themed paper plates.  We will soon return to Goodwill and find some plates for our family!
  • Our pressure cooker.  It was too big to store, so it’s gone.  We’re on the lookout, eventually, for a higher-end unit that is small.  But for now, we do without.  We’re down to 2 pans.
  • Our popcorn popper.  All right, so we still have it!  And we’re going to use it next week, when we stay in a rental cottage.  But it takes up so much space that we have is stowed and never gets taken out.  And Rob is learning to pop corn in our saucepan.

And what unexpected luxuries have we kept?

  • Stemware.  Mason jars don’t cut it for us.  We keep this bit of elegance.  Of course, we’re constantly breaking glasses, so they never match.
  •  The slow cooker.  I love it.  It’s wonderful to set it, head to work, and have a lovely roast waiting when I get home!
  • A coffee maker.  We did the French press thing for awhile, but we drink too much coffee!  I love to set the coffee pot, then have it wake me up in the morning.
  • A tea kettle.  It boils water.  Fast.  And it doesn’t make it taste like anything else.

So what do we cook in my kitchen?  Normally, we eat very simple meals.  I’ll buy pre-cooked meat, which we’ll eat with a salad.  When it’s nice out, we have burgers and a salad.  When it’s cold, I cook.  When it’s not, we eat salad.  I make sure to eat a lot of protein, with a few carbs and lots of veggies.

But sometimes, we like to do something special.  Here is a fancy dinner we prepared in my kitchen:

DSC_0066[1]

First up is this low-carb lasagna recipe I found.   I browned the beef on the stove, then assembled everything in the slow cooker.  Notice the door above me.

DSC_0074[1]

 

While the slow cooker did its magic, I simmered the mulled wine on the stove.  In place of brandy, we used our homemade orange liquor.

DSC_0072[1]

 

There was some zucchini left over, and Beanie decided this was her new favorite snack.  She is standing on the steps.

DSC_0071[1]

It was a crazy, fun night for mother and daughter alike!

 

Are you working toward a simpler lifestyle?  Then I would love to share your story!  Please submit your original (not published anywhere else) story about how you are simplifying your life.  You don’t have to be an extreme minimalist–I would love to share stories of people who are just starting out of their journey.  If your story is selected to be featured, you will receive 50% off the the Simple Living Basics E-Course, after any other discounts.  Send your story to brosselit@gmail.com . 

New to Simple Living?  Then check out our Simple Living Basics e-course.  There are plenty of discounts available, and it will be an investment in a lower-stress more focused lifestyle!

Something We Do Without: Electric Cooking Appliances

Originally posted February 2013

When we first got married, we had a very well-stocked kitchen. In included an electric can opener, a toaster with inserts so it could actually cook entire sandwiches, a pizza cooker, a deep fryer, a coffee maker with a timer, two slow cookers, an ice cream maker, a toaster oven, an electric coffee grinder, two popcorn poppers, two electric mixers, a blender, and a smoothie maker.

Now we have none of that.

Let me explain each item’s demise, and how we still eat wonderful meals without it:

Electric Can Opener: OK, do they ever actually work? I’ve never seen one that didn’t sometimes chew things up, rather than doing its job. We always had cheap manual openers, which failed about as well as the electric. Then my friend got us a Good Cook brand manual opener that does the trick perfectly every time, with no rough edges on the cans. AND, it doesn’t use fossil fuels to do it! We’ve had this can opener for over 6 years, and it still works as well as it did when it was new.

Toaster: Well, the sandwich toaster was always having cheese and butter dripping down into it, so it became a fire hazard. Then, we decided we really didn’t need an appliance specifically for the purpose of burning bread. When we want to eat toast, we fry it up in butter, in our skillet. It tastes infinitely better that way. Trust me.

Pizza Cooker: Really? Putting pizza dough in a pan and cooking it in the oven or on the grill really isn’t that big of a deal. We always thought this was frivolous, anyway. We only owned it because our power wasn’t hooked up, we wanted to eat, and it was at the Salvation Army store, waiting for us. So it served its purpose.

Deep Fryer: Well, we put the plastic lid on it while it was frying, and the lid melted into the fryer. So that was that. We didn’t replace it, because, the few times we actually deep fry something, a saucepan full of fat suffices.

Coffee Maker: We love coffee. We really love coffee. We’ve got coffee making down to a science, actually. And we’ve been through our share of electric coffee makers. The fancy ones with the timers don’t last long. The electronics always seem to get fried. We had a wonderful DeLongi that didn’t make it a year. We thought it was defective and called the company, but there was nothing wrong with it. Our Cuisinart only made it a few months as well. We liked our Bunn, but we didn’t like the fact that it was always drawing electricity. The cheap Proctor-Silox machines last, but the coffee didn’t taste as good. Finally, we switched to the French press and a tea kettle, and they have never let us down.

Slow Cookers: Slow cookers are wonderful. I think you probably should only have one, but I won’t fault you for keeping it. They use very little energy and make cooking much simpler. We just found that we preferred cooking on the stove or grill, and that we didn’t use ours much. When we want to slow cook, we use the cast iron saucepan over low heat. It does the same thing.

Ice Cream Maker: If you make ice cream as a hobby, go for it! However, this was a purchased dream that we had. We owned it, and never once made ice cream. We try to limit sweets anyway.

Toaster Oven: We have an oven. So having another one is a bit redundant. It was great for toasting bagels and sandwiches, but it really didn’t justify the cupboard space that this device occupied.

Coffee Grinder: We thought we were sophisticated, grinding our own beans. Except they didn’t taste much different from store-ground. Sometimes it even tasted worse. Why? Because those cheap grinders demolish the beans. For good coffee, you need a burr mill grinder. And those aren’t cheap, if you go electric. Our Spong hand grinder is lovely, and it grinds the beans to perfection.

Popcorn Poppers: The air poppers had to go. Face it, popcorn needs oil. We pop it in butter now, which is way better than air-popped. We do allow ourselves one electric Stir Crazy popper in our house, and it gets used a lot. Popcorn is a low-cal, filling snack. We’re addicted. Maybe someday I’ll master popping corn on the stove.

Electric Mixers: If you make lots of pastries, cookies, and cakes, maybe you need one. I can’t get meringues to fluff without it. But, we don’t bake lots of sweets. And hand mixing has worked just fine for us.

Blender: If you’re really into smoothies, by all means get one! We just don’t blend much.

Smoothie Maker: OK, get the blender. But do you really need a separate blender for making smoothies?

So, there you have it! A little inspiration to help you on your decluttering adventure.

Are you working toward a simpler lifestyle?  Then I would love to share your story!  Please submit your original (not published anywhere else) story about how you are simplifying your life.  You don’t have to be an extreme minimalist–I would love to share stories of people who are just starting out of their journey.  If your story is selected to be featured, you will receive 50% off the the Simple Living Basics E-Course, after any other discounts.  Send your story to brosselit@gmail.com . 

New to Simple Living?  Then check out our Simple Living Basics e-course.  There are plenty of discounts available, and it will be an investment in a lower-stress more focused lifestyle!

A Tale of Two Kitchens

Three months ago, this was my kitchen:

The kitchen has a window into the living room.

 

DSC_0038

 

Notice the double sink with hot water, the dishwasher, the oven, and all the floor and cupboard space?  While the apartment kitchen was certainly small, it was an adjustment to move from that to this:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

You can imagine what an adjustment this was!

And around the same time that I moved, Lois from The Eco-Grandma moved from a 300 square foot apartment into a house.  This, too, was an adjustment.

As we settled into our new homes, I began to notice the changes that I was making in my kitchen, and I began to wonder what changes Lois was making.  What lessons had she learned from simplicity?  What luxuries was she choosing to indulge in, now that she can?

As a result of the changes we have made, Lois and I decided to co-ordinate our posts and invite you into our kitchens today.  I will show you how things work in my kitchen, and then you can head over to The Eco-Grandma to visit Lois’s kitchen.  (And we will both be sharing a recipe with you!)

Living in less than 200 square feet has been interesting, and our biggest adjustment has been the galley.  First off, the companionway, aka our DOOR, is right above the counter.  In fact, the countertop is a step that must be used in order to enter the cabin without falling down.  Below the counter is a small ladder, which we refer to as “the steps.”  Both Beanie and the cat like to perch on the steps, especially when I am cooking.

So where do I stand when I cook?  In a teeny, tiny corner, next to the steps!  Our kitchen is equipped with a single-basin RV sink.  While we have a knob for both hot and cold water, only the cold water knob will turn on the faucet.  The water temperature is quite cold in the winter, but hot in the summer.  This is due to the fact that we use shore water, which sits in an RV hose for great periods of time.

Our range is a luxury for a sailboat–it’s dual-powered.  We run it on electricity in our slip, but we can run it on alcohol when we’re anchored out.  We have a bottle Everclear for this purpose!  The range has a stainless cover that turns it into additional counter space when we’re not using it.

We also have a gas grill mounted on the stern rail–it doubles as our oven.  When we feel like picnicking, we have access to communal gas and charcoal grills.  We have a medium-sized dorm fridge and a small amount of cupboard space.

Having such a small kitchen has led me to learn to do without some amenities.  This hasn’t been a huge adjustment, since we were already living rather minimalistically.  We already had service for 3, 3 pans, no toaster, and limited appliances.  But what have we gotten rid of since we moved here?

  • Our blender.  Yes, I used to love making smoothies.  But it isn’t worth the effort to unstow the blender, and then to clean up afterwards.
  • Our plates.  This isn’t permanent, but they broke in the move.  After a month of using bowls, we missed them and bought some Thanksgiving-themed paper plates.  We will soon return to Goodwill and find some plates for our family!
  • Our pressure cooker.  It was too big to store, so it’s gone.  We’re on the lookout, eventually, for a higher-end unit that is small.  But for now, we do without.  We’re down to 2 pans.
  • Our popcorn popper.  All right, so we still have it!  And we’re going to use it next week, when we stay in a rental cottage.  But it takes up so much space that we have is stowed and never gets taken out.  And Rob is learning to pop corn in our saucepan.

And what unexpected luxuries have we kept?

  • Stemware.  Mason jars don’t cut it for us.  We keep this bit of elegance.  Of course, we’re constantly breaking glasses, so they never match.
  •  The slow cooker.  I love it.  It’s wonderful to set it, head to work, and have a lovely roast waiting when I get home!
  • A coffee maker.  We did the French press thing for awhile, but we drink too much coffee!  I love to set the coffee pot, then have it wake me up in the morning.
  • A tea kettle.  It boils water.  Fast.  And it doesn’t make it taste like anything else.

So what do we cook in my kitchen?  Normally, we eat very simple meals.  I’ll buy pre-cooked meat, which we’ll eat with a salad.  When it’s nice out, we have burgers and a salad.  When it’s cold, I cook.  When it’s not, we eat salad.  I make sure to eat a lot of protein, with a few carbs and lots of veggies.

But sometimes, we like to do something special.  Here is a fancy dinner we prepared in my kitchen:

DSC_0066[1]

First up is this low-carb lasagna recipe I found.   I browned the beef on the stove, then assembled everything in the slow cooker.  Notice the door above me.

DSC_0074[1]

 

While the slow cooker did its magic, I simmered the mulled wine on the stove.  In place of brandy, we used our homemade orange liquor.

DSC_0072[1]

 

There was some zucchini left over, and Beanie decided this was her new favorite snack.  She is standing on the steps.

DSC_0071[1]

It was a crazy, fun night for mother and daughter alike!

 

 

Dinner in the Basement Kitchen!

When we first moved down to the basement, we had planned on doing our cooking upstairs, on the stove. But there was one big problem with this–it was too cold! It’s fine for quickly putting something in the oven, but I found that we were ordering take-out, rather than spending the time freezing with a pot on the stove. And coffee–that just wasn’t happening, which truly is a tragedy.

So, enter our hot plate. We found this at Rite Aid, actually, for $20. Not only does it heat water for our coffee, but, sitting on our washing machine, it makes the perfect minimalist stove. The burner is a Proctor Silex fifth burner. Because it is made completely of metal, it should be easy to replace any of its components, if they should break.

Tonight’s dinner? Mushroom risotto!

Our new knife, a Weusthof, 8 inch, found on sale at a local shop. Definitely worth the $$$!

And yes, that mocktail is in a mason jar. You drink out of one too. Admit it.

Before I go, I would like to address our plate situation, as I have gotten a lot of questions about this. Yes, we have three plates, and three sets of silverware. No, this is not the required number of place settings for every minimalist to have. You might be happier with service for 12, and we won’t kick you out of the club for that. But here’s why 3 works for us.

We have no discipline. When we had service for 8, we never washed a dish, until all 8 were used. This led to a pile-up in the dishwasher, which didn’t get run until it was full. And owning a dishwasher means, rinsing, loading, unloading, and putting away all of those dishes. And if we procrastinated on a step–which we did–it led to an unsightly pile-up.

So, with three dishes, the worst we can do is have to quickly wash them before dinner is ready. And that takes a whole 3 minutes. A much better solution, I think.

What do we do when we have company? Well, first you have to realize that anybody who is going to come and visit us already knows that we are…well…us. So they are not expecting an experience that resembles mainstream, in any form. Our parents like to bring their own dishes. As for everyone else–we’ve got bowls, storage containers, lids from storage container, and the cutting board! Parents usually share a plate with their kid, or the kids will all share a plate. The guests always get the real plates, and the forks, if necessary. Rob and I will eat with spoons or chopsticks.

And we’ve got plenty of mason jars for everyone.

Something We Do Without: Electric Cooking Appliances

This month, I will be posting each week about “Something We Do Without” and “Something We Keep.” This will allow me to show you what items have no place in our minimalist lifestyle and which items we find indispensable. I have already posted about three items we do without: a dishwasher, a television and a microwave. Today I will tell you a little more about our kitchen.

When we first got married, we had a very well-stocked kitchen. In included an electric can opener, a toaster with inserts so it could actually cook entire sandwiches, a pizza cooker, a deep fryer, a coffee maker with a timer, two slow cookers, an ice cream maker, a toaster oven, an electric coffee grinder, two popcorn poppers, two electric mixers, a blender, and a smoothie maker.

Now we have none of that.

Let me explain each item’s demise, and how we still eat wonderful meals without it:

Electric Can Opener: OK, do they ever actually work? I’ve never seen one that didn’t sometimes chew things up, rather than doing its job. We always had cheap manual openers, which failed about as well as the electric. Then my friend got us a Good Cook brand manual opener that does the trick perfectly every time, with no rough edges on the cans. AND, it doesn’t use fossil fuels to do it! We’ve had this can opener for over 6 years, and it still works as well as it did when it was new.

Toaster: Well, the sandwich toaster was always having cheese and butter dripping down into it, so it became a fire hazard. Then, we decided we really didn’t need an appliance specifically for the purpose of burning bread. When we want to eat toast, we fry it up in butter, in our skillet. It tastes infinitely better that way. Trust me.

Pizza Cooker: Really? Putting pizza dough in a pan and cooking it in the oven or on the grill really isn’t that big of a deal. We always thought this was frivolous, anyway. We only owned it because our power wasn’t hooked up, we wanted to eat, and it was at the Salvation Army store, waiting for us. So it served its purpose.

Deep Fryer: Well, we put the plastic lid on it while it was frying, and the lid melted into the fryer. So that was that. We didn’t replace it, because, the few times we actually deep fry something, a saucepan full of fat suffices.

Coffee Maker: We love coffee. We really love coffee. We’ve got coffee making down to a science, actually. And we’ve been through our share of electric coffee makers. The fancy ones with the timers don’t last long. The electronics always seem to get fried. We had a wonderful DeLongi that didn’t make it a year. We thought it was defective and called the company, but there was nothing wrong with it. Our Cuisinart only made it a few months as well. We liked our Bunn, but we didn’t like the fact that it was always drawing electricity. The cheap Proctor-Silox machines last, but the coffee didn’t taste as good. Finally, we switched to the French press and a tea kettle, and they have never let us down.

Slow Cookers: Slow cookers are wonderful. I think you probably should only have one, but I won’t fault you for keeping it. They use very little energy and make cooking much simpler. We just found that we preferred cooking on the stove or grill, and that we didn’t use ours much. When we want to slow cook, we use the cast iron saucepan over low heat. It does the same thing.

Ice Cream Maker: If you make ice cream as a hobby, go for it! However, this was a purchased dream that we had. We owned it, and never once made ice cream. We try to limit sweets anyway.

Toaster Oven: We have an oven. So having another one is a bit redundant. It was great for toasting bagels and sandwiches, but it really didn’t justify the cupboard space that this device occupied.

Coffee Grinder: We thought we were sophisticated, grinding our own beans. Except they didn’t taste much different from store-ground. Sometimes it even tasted worse. Why? Because those cheap grinders demolish the beans. For good coffee, you need a burr mill grinder. And those aren’t cheap, if you go electric. Our Spong hand grinder is lovely, and it grinds the beans to perfection.

Popcorn Poppers: The air poppers had to go. Face it, popcorn needs oil. We pop it in butter now, which is way better than air-popped. We do allow ourselves one electric Stir Crazy popper in our house, and it gets used a lot. Popcorn is a low-cal, filling snack. We’re addicted. Maybe someday I’ll master popping corn on the stove.

Electric Mixers: If you make lots of pastries, cookies, and cakes, maybe you need one. I can’t get meringues to fluff without it. But, we don’t bake lots of sweets. And hand mixing has worked just fine for us.

Blender: If you’re really into smoothies, by all means get one! We just don’t blend much.

Smoothie Maker: OK, get the blender. But do you really need a separate blender for making smoothies?

So, there you have it! A little inspiration to help you on your decluttering adventure.

Minimalism Success: The Kitchen

Once a week, I will be focusing on one area in which we have been successful in living minimalistically, and one area that is still a challenge. I would have to say that our biggest success is definitely the kitchen. I’ve posted pictures of our kitchen numerous times. Here is the story of how we transformed a rather ugly kitchen into something fun and usable. This is a post about our stove, and here is a post about our refrigerator. Here is the transformation of my sink, after I polished it, per Fly Lady’s advice. This is a post about our dishes. Recently, I posted this about decluttering the cupboards.

So, today, I will be letting you know how we make it all work. How do we cook from scratch in a sparsely-appointed kitchen, and how does it make our lives easier?

First, let me tell you about cleaning. I begin each day by making a pot of coffee. While the water is heating up in the tea kettle, I usually wash the dishes from the night before and wipe the counters and the stovetop. (I try to do this right after dinner, but that usually doesn’t happen). This process is done well before the water boils. After we enjoy our coffee, I rinse out the French press, wipe the sink, spray it with a solution, and wipe it again. We then rinse our plates in hot water after each meal, using soap if necessary (it often isn’t necessary, if our food was something dry like sandwiches). This takes 3-5 minutes. Usually, the pan we used just needs to be wiped off. Sometimes I have to use water. The saucepan takes a little longer to scrape clean, especially if we have pasta. When we use the grill, there are no pans to clean. We vacuum the floor once a week, and I usually wipe the linoleum once a week, using the spray solution. We clean out the fridge before going grocery shopping, and wipe any spills with the spray solution. We don’t spend a great deal of time cleaning the kitchen.

So what about cooking? Most of our meals are very simple. We’ll have burgers or brats, with a salad on the side. Or I’ll cook up grains and cheese, with the vegetables mixed in. We’ll make pizzas with lots of veggies. Sometimes I’ll make vegetable soup out of homemade broth.

But what if we wanted to make something fancy? It’s not too hard. I could make lasagna noodles the day before. Then, I could assemble the lasagna in my saucepan and bake it in the oven. While it is cooking, I could put corn-on-the-cob on the grill (still in the husks!) and assemble the cashew salad. I could then bake apple crisp in the skillet. Voila! A nice, fancy dinner, cooked simply. Clean-up will involve washing the plates and utencils, wiping the skillet with a wet washcloth, and drying it, and washing the saucepan in hot water. The cashew salad would have been made in one of my plastic storage containers, so the leftovers would be ready to go in the fridge.

When we were staying in Ossineke last summer, we had a multitude of dishes to use, as well as a dishwasher. We found that living that way was not easier. Sure, we just put our dishes in the dishwasher, after we were done with them, then ran it when it was full. But pre-washing the dishes before, then putting them away after, actually took a lot more time than just rinsing 3 plates. Using more pots and pans also resulted in more clean-up.

So, have you found your family’s “happy place” with kitchen decluttering? How do you keep your kitchen under control?

Zero Waste Wednesday: Getting the Kitchen Under Control

At times reducing waste and minimalism seem to be at odds with each other.

We want to have fewer things. But we don’t want anything to be disposable. So that leads to more storage containers and, thus, more things.

If I were counting possessions and aiming for 100, I would not worry about reducing waste.

But true minimalism is not about counting possessions, it’s about living deliberately. It’s about having just enough reusable containers.

And I had way more than just enough. It was time to go through my cupboards. Would you like to see my progress?

First, the medicine and spice cupboard. I have natural remedies on the left and standard medicines on the right. Hopefully, as we work to eat less poison and focus more on wellness, I will need less on both sides. The spices look cluttered, but that’s because I’m not using half of the space. I can never reach or see anything in the back of that shelf, so I slid them all forward. I’m going to keep track of which spices I use over the course of a month and pare down even more. I hate the top shelf since I can not reach it, so I just used it for things that we rarely use.

Before moving on to the next cupboard, we cleaned out the junk drawers! We had two, as well as a black box that collected junk. These are definitely our “hot spots!” Now, we’ve got one drawer for kitchen utensils ONLY and another for “awesome meal” supplies. I will look through these as part of my daily routine, and immediately remove anything that doesn’t belong there.

This cupboard is strictly for homebrewing supplies. Brewing our own beer, wine, and kombucha not only reduces waste, it also saves us money!

This cupboard used to be a disaster. The top shelf held our cleaning chemicals, which I moved to the cupboard over the washing machine. I went through my “mommy file” and eliminated any paperwork from Beanie’s school that I didn’t need anymore. I also purged out my Home Management Guide. I decided to keep my lunch-packing supplies here as well. On the bottom shelf, I got rid of one of our ceramic mugs. We really don’t need both ceramic mugs and travel mugs, but one mug says “#1 Dad” and has pictures of Beanie on it, so we’ll keep it.

Our lower middle cupboard is just for the garbage and bags, and I did nothing there.

This cupboard is now for food and FULL containers. It usually gets packed full, so I’ve decided to grocery shop once a week, rather than every other week. This should reduce the stockpiling.

I keep the empty containers down below. I listed all the items that I might buy in bulk and only kept that many containers. We also keep our washcloths, which we use instead of paper towels, down here.

How do you organize your low-waste kitchen?